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Vincenzo (Vincent) Giannella

Head Judo Instructor

Vincenzo (Vincent) Giannella

Head Judo Instructor

Biography

Mr. Giannella started judo at the age of 6 ½ in Brazil under the guidance of sensei Massao Shinohara (9th dan and former Brazilian national coach) and his son Luis Junit Shinohara (7th dan and also former t Brazilian national coach) . Mr. Giannella trained competitively and represented the “Vila Sonia” dojo club in the 80s at the city, region, state and national levels with several state titles and as high as 3rd in the Nationals.

He obtained his black belt in 1986 in Brazil and took a hiatus from judo after completing college to pursuit his professional carrier. He immigrated to the U.S. to pursuit a dream job in the IT industry and had the opportunity to get back to regular practice in Tampa FL under the guidance of sensei Lou Butitta (5th dan) and Wayne Shultz (4th dan) as well as guest Kodokan instructors from Japan, Makoto Sakashita and Toshihiko Yamada. Mr. Giannella obtained his promotion to 2nd dan from the USJI in 2001.

Achievements:

  • Multi time city, region and state champion for Sao Paulo State in Brazil during the 80’s.
  • Member of junior team that won the National “Benemeritos” championship twice in the 80’s in Brazil.
  • South Region Junior champion 1984 – Brazil
  • 3rd Place in Junior Nationals 1984 – Brazil
  • 1st place and MVP in the Rio de la Plata International Invitational 1984 – Argentina
  • Sunshine State Games (Master) champion – 2000 and 2001– FL – USA
  • Kevin Book Invitational (Master) champion – 2000 and 2001 – Gainesville FL

Why you like to coach:

Coaching for me is an opportunity to honor and show respect for the time and effort that all instructors and family dedicated to me during my learning process. I also love the sport and by coaching I can contribute perpetuating judo’s growth and teachings.

In judo I was taught at young age the importance of learning how to break falls properly so I would always be ready when thrown by an opponent and most importantly, avoid injury. This was the key to get up from falls ready to learn and understand why it happened so to improve and get better at my game. I was thrown a lot during my judo years and also in life;  judo and my parents’ teaching and guidance helped me prepare for most of life throws, though some can be harder than others, it is best when you are prepared. If I can share that feeling with a youngster that later applies this same principle to life then you got the answer of why I like coaching.